Forthcoming Special Issue: The Global Pacific; coastal and human habitats. (2021) Volume 81 Issue 3

2021-08-14

Inspired by Epeli Hao’Ofa’s revolutionary description of the Pacific as a ‘Sea of Islands’, the contributors to the special issue, ‘The Global Pacific: Coastal and Human Habitats’, demonstrate that the Pacific can be understood in new and innovative ways. Contributions include architectural imaginings, literary and aesthetic analyses, poetry, political analysis, and studies whose methodologies are based on Pacific ways of knowing. The juxtaposition of disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary approaches promotes dialogue and reflection from a ‘global perspective’, which aims to be inclusive of diverse experiences and Pacific ways of knowing.

Ian Fookes’ (2021) Editorial interrogates the term ‘global’ and briefly explores what is meant by the labelling of the Pacific as ‘global’. Considering what a ‘global perspective’ might constitute, the discussion helps to situate Ekistics Theory and the journal Ekistics and the New Habitat in relation to the field of Global Studies, before introducing the contributor’s texts. The combination of analyses found in the special issue is based on a shared concern for Anthropos, one of the five elements of Ekistics, and a common desire to innovate our thinking around the Pacific and how it is studied. The issue opens with a poem by Fiona Sherrfis, whose work reflects on a sense of unity and diversity within the Pacific, exploring the ways travellers perceive it.

Ricardo Arribas (2021) provides an analysis of the ways that space is reconceived and used as a pertinent critique in works by Ibrahim Miranda, John Puhiatau Pule, Epeli Hau’Ofa, and Eduardo Lalo. The article highlights the ways that intellectuals in archipelagic postcolonial spaces are faced with harsh dilemmas vis-à-vis their societies, pointing out the challenges in neo-colonial and postcolonial contexts in the Caribbean and the Pacific. Arribas analyses how the works of these artists and writers reimagine space and time in acts of resilience and reasserted agency.

Norman Wei’s (2021) contribution presents an exercise in imaginary architecture that deploys Pacific architectural techniques to reimagine the notion of land-based settlement. His study challenges Ekistics theory to develop, so as to come into dialogue with Pacific ways of knowing, and the special relationships to water prevalent in the Pacific. 

Ian Fookes (2021) then discusses the ways that Yuki Kihara’s work ‘A Song about Samoa ・サーモアについてのうた’ engages viewers in a specifically global art practice which embraces the political.  Fookes outlines the ways that Kihara challenges viewers to reimagine their understanding of themselves, their past, and the Pacific region more broadly. This article offers a transition to the International Relations oriented part of the issue.

Noakes and Powles (2021) present a critical literature review of recent texts on the Pacific from a Politics and International Relations perspective. The review concerns what is known about China’s shifting role in the region. The analysis highlights the need for analyses from within the Pacific to play a more prominent role in discussions about the rivalries and dynamics operating within the region.

Bangguo Du and Patrick Thomasen’s (2021) study, ‘Outside in the Moana? Exploring Chinese International Students’ Experiences of Studying in Pacific Studies at the University of Auckland through Su’ifefiloi’ is a demonstration of what can be understood when Sāmoan methodologies are used to study contemporary experiences in the Pacific. It provides not only a snapshot of the challenges of studying in Aotearoa New Zealand as a Chinese student, but also serves as an example for further studies into contemporary experiences within Pacific contexts.  

This discussion is extended by Tiyanyi Luo and Patrick Thomsen (2021) with an article based on a complementary study of the role that China is now playing in the formal study of Pacific languages. This analysis clearly indicates that China is engaging in the Pacific in new ways linked to the Belt and Road Project. Moreover, by using the Fa’afaletui methodology, Luo and Thomsen are able to grasp with clarity the structure and ambition of the Chinese language teaching policy currently being implemented.

The issue closes with a book review by Peggy Lauer from the Resource renewal Institute in California. Lauer presents a heartfelt account of Huey D. Johnson’s memoir ‘Something of the Marvellous: Lessons learned from my sixty years as an environmentalist’ (2021) (Fulcrum group). The review is an appropriate way to conclude the special issue: It describes the life and philosophy of an innovative and pragmatic land protector who played a key role in protecting the environment in the United States and the Pacific. Huey Johnson and his mission were truly global in nature and impact.  

References

Arribas, R. (2021) Spacing Decoloniality: De-figuring the Coloniality of Space and Subjectivity in the Caribbean and Oceania. Ekistics and the New Habitat, 81(3), (22 pages) (In press)

Du, B., & Thomsen, P. (2021). Outside in the Moana? Chinese International Students’ Experiences of Studying in Pacific Studies at The University of Auckland, New Zealand. Ekistics and the New Habitat, 81(3), (8 pages) (In press)

Fookes, I. (2021) Editorial. Ekistics and the New Habitat, 81(3), (4 pages) (In press)

Fookes, I. (2021). Yuki Kihara’s ‘A Song about Samoa ・サーモアについてのうた’: Reimagining the Pacific through Japanese relations. Ekistics and the New Habitat, 81(3), (9 pages) (In press)

Lauer, P. (2021) 'Something of the Marvellous' by Huey D. Johnson (Book Review)

Luo, T., & Thomsen, P. (2021). Exploring Sustainability through Chinese Study and Interest in the Sāmoan Language: A Situational Analysis Informed by Fa’afaletui. Ekistics and the New Habitat, 81(3), (9 pages) (In press)

Noakes, S. & Powles, A. (2021). What we Have (and Have not) Learned from Early Research on China’s Engagement in the Pacific. Ekistics and the New Habitat, 81(3), (6 pages) (In press)

Sherriffs, F. (2021) the second Friday of the week. Ekistics and the New Habitat, 81(3), (1 page) (In press)

 

Ekistics and the New Habitat

Special Issue: The Global Pacific; Coastal and Human Habitats.

Guest Editor: Ian Fookes

School of Cultures, Languages and Linguistics, University of Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand

Editorial

Ian Fookes (University of Auckland)

1. Poem: ‘the second Friday of the week’

by fiona chivers sherriffs 

2. Spacing Decoloniality: De-figuring the Coloniality of Space and Subjectivity in the Caribbean and    Oceania

Ricardo Arribas (University of Puerto Rico)  rja42@cornell.edu

3. Yuki Kihara’s ‘A Song about Samoa ・サーモアについてのうた’: Reimagining the Pacific through              Japanese relations

Ian Fookes (University of Auckland) ian.fookes@auckland.ac.nz

4. Pacific Men – A Future Speculation developed from Pacific Architectonics

Norman Wei (University of Auckland) nnwei017@gmail.com

5. What we Have (and Have not) Learned from Early Research on China’s Engagement in the Pacific

Stephen Noakes & Anna Powles (University of Auckland / Massey University) s.noakes@auckland.ac.nz

6. Exploring Sustainability through Chinese Study and Interest in the Sāmoan Language: A Situational  Analysis Informed by Fa’afaletui

Tiyanyi Luo and Patrick Thomsen (University of Auckland) patrick.thomsen@auckland.ac.nz

7. Outside in the Moana? Exploring Chinese International Students’ Experiences of Studying in Pacific Studies at the University of Auckland through Su’ifefiloi

Bangguo Du and Patrick Thomasen (University of Auckland) patrick.thomsen@auckland.ac.nz

Book Review

'Something of the Marvellous' by Huey D. Johnson (Review)

Peggy Lauer (Resource Renewal Institute) peggymlauer@gmail.com